QDate

The QDate class provides date functions. More

Inheritance diagram of PySide2.QtCore.QDate

Synopsis

Functions

Static functions

Detailed Description

A QDate object represents a particular date. This can be expressed as a calendar date, i.e. year, month, and day numbers, in the proleptic Gregorian calendar.

A QDate object is typically created by giving the year, month, and day numbers explicitly. Note that QDate interprets year numbers less than 100 as presented, i.e., as years 1 through 99, without adding any offset. The static function currentDate() creates a QDate object containing the date read from the system clock. An explicit date can also be set using setDate() . The fromString() function returns a QDate given a string and a date format which is used to interpret the date within the string.

The year() , month() , and day() functions provide access to the year, month, and day numbers. Also, dayOfWeek() and dayOfYear() functions are provided. The same information is provided in textual format by toString() . The day and month numbers can be mapped to names using QLocale .

QDate provides a full set of operators to compare two QDate objects where smaller means earlier, and larger means later.

You can increment (or decrement) a date by a given number of days using addDays() . Similarly you can use addMonths() and addYears() . The daysTo() function returns the number of days between two dates.

The daysInMonth() and daysInYear() functions return how many days there are in this date’s month and year, respectively. The isLeapYear() function indicates whether a date is in a leap year.

Remarks

No Year 0

There is no year 0. Dates in that year are considered invalid. The year -1 is the year “1 before Christ” or “1 before current era.” The day before 1 January 1 CE, QDate (1, 1, 1), is 31 December 1 BCE, QDate (-1, 12, 31).

Range of Valid Dates

Dates are stored internally as a Julian Day number, an integer count of every day in a contiguous range, with 24 November 4714 BCE in the Gregorian calendar being Julian Day 0 (1 January 4713 BCE in the Julian calendar). As well as being an efficient and accurate way of storing an absolute date, it is suitable for converting a date into other calendar systems such as Hebrew, Islamic or Chinese. The Julian Day number can be obtained using toJulianDay() and can be set using fromJulianDay() .

The range of dates able to be stored by QDate as a Julian Day number is for technical reasons limited to between -784350574879 and 784354017364, which means from before 2 billion BCE to after 2 billion CE.

class QDate

QDate(QDate)

QDate(y, m, d)

QDate(y, m, d, cal)

param y

int

param m

int

param cal

QCalendar

param QDate

QDate

param d

int

Constructs a null date. Null dates are invalid.

See also

isNull() isValid()

Constructs a date with year y , month m and day d .

The date is understood in terms of the Gregorian calendar. If the specified date is invalid, the date is not set and isValid() returns false .

Warning

Years 1 to 99 are interpreted as is. Year 0 is invalid.

PySide2.QtCore.QDate.MonthNameType

This enum describes the types of the string representation used for the month name.

Constant

Description

QDate.DateFormat

This type of name can be used for date-to-string formatting.

QDate.StandaloneFormat

This type is used when you need to enumerate months or weekdays. Usually standalone names are represented in singular forms with capitalized first letter.

PySide2.QtCore.QDate.__reduce__()
Return type

PyObject

PySide2.QtCore.QDate.__repr__()
Return type

PyObject

PySide2.QtCore.QDate.addDays(days)
Parameters

daysqint64

Return type

QDate

Returns a QDate object containing a date ndays later than the date of this object (or earlier if ndays is negative).

Returns a null date if the current date is invalid or the new date is out of range.

PySide2.QtCore.QDate.addMonths(months)
Parameters

monthsint

Return type

QDate

This is an overloaded function.

PySide2.QtCore.QDate.addMonths(months, cal)
Parameters
Return type

QDate

Returns a QDate object containing a date nmonths later than the date of this object (or earlier if nmonths is negative).

Uses cal as calendar, if supplied, else the Gregorian calendar.

Note

If the ending day/month combination does not exist in the resulting month/year, this function will return a date that is the latest valid date in the selected month.

PySide2.QtCore.QDate.addYears(years)
Parameters

yearsint

Return type

QDate

This is an overloaded function.

PySide2.QtCore.QDate.addYears(years, cal)
Parameters
Return type

QDate

Returns a QDate object containing a date nyears later than the date of this object (or earlier if nyears is negative).

Uses cal as calendar, if supplied, else the Gregorian calendar.

Note

If the ending day/month combination does not exist in the resulting year (e.g., for the Gregorian calendar, if the date was Feb 29 and the final year is not a leap year), this function will return a date that is the latest valid date in the given month (in the example, Feb 28).

static PySide2.QtCore.QDate.currentDate()
Return type

QDate

Returns the current date, as reported by the system clock.

PySide2.QtCore.QDate.day()
Return type

int

This is an overloaded function.

PySide2.QtCore.QDate.day(cal)
Parameters

calQCalendar

Return type

int

Returns the day of the month for this date.

Uses cal as calendar if supplied, else the Gregorian calendar (for which the return ranges from 1 to 31). Returns 0 if the date is invalid.

PySide2.QtCore.QDate.dayOfWeek()
Return type

int

This is an overloaded function.

PySide2.QtCore.QDate.dayOfWeek(cal)
Parameters

calQCalendar

Return type

int

Returns the weekday (1 = Monday to 7 = Sunday) for this date.

Uses cal as calendar if supplied, else the Gregorian calendar. Returns 0 if the date is invalid. Some calendars may give special meaning (e.g. intercallary days) to values greater than 7.

See also

day() dayOfYear() DayOfWeek

PySide2.QtCore.QDate.dayOfYear(cal)
Parameters

calQCalendar

Return type

int

Returns the day of the year (1 for the first day) for this date.

Uses cal as calendar if supplied, else the Gregorian calendar. Returns 0 if either the date or the first day of its year is invalid.

See also

day() dayOfWeek()

PySide2.QtCore.QDate.dayOfYear()
Return type

int

This is an overloaded function.

PySide2.QtCore.QDate.daysInMonth()
Return type

int

This is an overloaded function.

PySide2.QtCore.QDate.daysInMonth(cal)
Parameters

calQCalendar

Return type

int

Returns the number of days in the month for this date.

Uses cal as calendar if supplied, else the Gregorian calendar (for which the result ranges from 28 to 31). Returns 0 if the date is invalid.

See also

day() daysInYear()

PySide2.QtCore.QDate.daysInYear()
Return type

int

This is an overloaded function.

PySide2.QtCore.QDate.daysInYear(cal)
Parameters

calQCalendar

Return type

int

Returns the number of days in the year for this date.

Uses cal as calendar if supplied, else the Gregorian calendar (for which the result is 365 or 366). Returns 0 if the date is invalid.

See also

day() daysInMonth()

PySide2.QtCore.QDate.daysTo(arg__1)
Parameters

arg__1QDate

Return type

qint64

Returns the number of days from this date to d (which is negative if d is earlier than this date).

Returns 0 if either date is invalid.

Example:

d1 = QDate(1995, 5, 17)  # May 17, 1995
d2 = QDate(1995, 5, 20)  # May 20, 1995
d1.daysTo(d2)          # returns 3
d2.daysTo(d1)          # returns -3

See also

addDays()

PySide2.QtCore.QDate.endOfDay([spec=Qt.LocalTime[, offsetSeconds=0]])
Parameters
  • specTimeSpec

  • offsetSecondsint

Return type

QDateTime

PySide2.QtCore.QDate.endOfDay(zone)
Parameters

zoneQTimeZone

Return type

QDateTime

This is an overloaded function.

static PySide2.QtCore.QDate.fromJulianDay(jd_)
Parameters

jdqint64

Return type

QDate

Converts the Julian day jd to a QDate .

See also

toJulianDay()

static PySide2.QtCore.QDate.fromString(s[, f=Qt.TextDate])
Parameters
  • s – unicode

  • fDateFormat

Return type

QDate

static PySide2.QtCore.QDate.fromString(s, format)
Parameters
  • s – unicode

  • format – unicode

Return type

QDate

static PySide2.QtCore.QDate.fromString(s, format, cal)
Parameters
  • s – unicode

  • format – unicode

  • calQCalendar

Return type

QDate

Returns the QDate represented by the string , using the format given, or an invalid date if the string cannot be parsed.

Uses cal as calendar if supplied, else the Gregorian calendar. Ranges of values in the format descriptions below are for the latter; they may be different for other calendars.

These expressions may be used for the format:

Expression

Output

d

The day as a number without a leading zero (1 to 31)

dd

The day as a number with a leading zero (01 to 31)

ddd

The abbreviated localized day name (e.g. ‘Mon’ to ‘Sun’). Uses the system locale to localize the name, i.e. system() .

dddd

The long localized day name (e.g. ‘Monday’ to ‘Sunday’). Uses the system locale to localize the name, i.e. system() .

M

The month as a number without a leading zero (1 to 12)

MM

The month as a number with a leading zero (01 to 12)

MMM

The abbreviated localized month name (e.g. ‘Jan’ to ‘Dec’). Uses the system locale to localize the name, i.e. system() .

MMMM

The long localized month name (e.g. ‘January’ to ‘December’). Uses the system locale to localize the name, i.e. system() .

yy

The year as a two digit number (00 to 99)

yyyy

The year as a four digit number, possibly plus a leading minus sign for negative years.

Note

Unlike the other version of this function, day and month names must be given in the user’s local language. It is only possible to use the English names if the user’s language is English.

All other input characters will be treated as text. Any sequence of characters that are enclosed in single quotes will also be treated as text and will not be used as an expression. For example:

date = QDate.fromString("1MM12car2003", "d'MM'MMcaryyyy")
# date is 1 December 2003

If the format is not satisfied, an invalid QDate is returned. The expressions that don’t expect leading zeroes (d, M) will be greedy. This means that they will use two digits even if this will put them outside the accepted range of values and leaves too few digits for other sections. For example, the following format string could have meant January 30 but the M will grab two digits, resulting in an invalid date:

date = QDate.fromString("130", "Md") # invalid

For any field that is not represented in the format the following defaults are used:

Field

Default value

Year

1900

Month

1

Day

1

The following examples demonstrate the default values:

QDate.fromString("1.30", "M.d")           # January 30 1900
QDate.fromString("20000110", "yyyyMMdd")  # January 10, 2000
QDate.fromString("20000110", "yyyyMd")    # January 10, 2000
PySide2.QtCore.QDate.getDate(year, month, day)
Parameters
  • yearint

  • monthint

  • dayint

Extracts the date’s year, month, and day, and assigns them to *``year`` , *``month`` , and *``day`` . The pointers may be null.

Returns 0 if the date is invalid.

Note

In Qt versions prior to 5.7, this function is marked as non-const .

static PySide2.QtCore.QDate.isLeapYear(year)
Parameters

yearint

Return type

bool

Returns true if the specified year is a leap year in the Gregorian calendar; otherwise returns false .

See also

isLeapYear()

PySide2.QtCore.QDate.isNull()
Return type

bool

Returns true if the date is null; otherwise returns false . A null date is invalid.

Note

The behavior of this function is equivalent to isValid() .

See also

isValid()

PySide2.QtCore.QDate.isValid()
Return type

bool

Returns true if this date is valid; otherwise returns false .

static PySide2.QtCore.QDate.isValid(y, m, d)
Parameters
  • yint

  • mint

  • dint

Return type

bool

This is an overloaded function.

Returns true if the specified date (year , month , and day ) is valid in the Gregorian calendar; otherwise returns false .

Example:

QDate.isValid(2002, 5, 17)  # True
QDate.isValid(2002, 2, 30)  # False (Feb 30 does not exist)
QDate.isValid(2004, 2, 29)  # True (2004 is a leap year)
QDate.isValid(2000, 2, 29)  # True (2000 is a leap year)
QDate.isValid(2006, 2, 29)  # False (2006 is not a leap year)
QDate.isValid(2100, 2, 29)  # False (2100 is not a leap year)
QDate.isValid(1202, 6, 6)   # True (even though 1202 is pre-Gregorian)
static PySide2.QtCore.QDate.longDayName(weekday[, type=DateFormat])
Parameters
Return type

unicode

Note

This function is deprecated.

Returns the long name of the weekday for the representation specified by type .

The days are enumerated using the following convention:

  • 1 = “Monday”

  • 2 = “Tuesday”

  • 3 = “Wednesday”

  • 4 = “Thursday”

  • 5 = “Friday”

  • 6 = “Saturday”

  • 7 = “Sunday”

The day names will be localized according to the system’s locale settings, i.e. using system() .

Returns an empty string if the date is invalid.

static PySide2.QtCore.QDate.longMonthName(month[, type=DateFormat])
Parameters
Return type

unicode

Note

This function is deprecated.

Returns the long name of the month for the representation specified by type .

The months are enumerated using the following convention:

  • 1 = “January”

  • 2 = “February”

  • 3 = “March”

  • 4 = “April”

  • 5 = “May”

  • 6 = “June”

  • 7 = “July”

  • 8 = “August”

  • 9 = “September”

  • 10 = “October”

  • 11 = “November”

  • 12 = “December”

The month names will be localized according to the system’s locale settings, i.e. using system() .

Returns an empty string if the date is invalid.

PySide2.QtCore.QDate.month()
Return type

int

This is an overloaded function.

PySide2.QtCore.QDate.month(cal)
Parameters

calQCalendar

Return type

int

Returns the month-number for the date.

Numbers the months of the year starting with 1 for the first. Uses cal as calendar if supplied, else the Gregorian calendar, for which the month numbering is as follows:

  • 1 = “January”

  • 2 = “February”

  • 3 = “March”

  • 4 = “April”

  • 5 = “May”

  • 6 = “June”

  • 7 = “July”

  • 8 = “August”

  • 9 = “September”

  • 10 = “October”

  • 11 = “November”

  • 12 = “December”

Returns 0 if the date is invalid. Note that some calendars may have more than 12 months in some years.

See also

year() day()

PySide2.QtCore.QDate.__ne__(other)
Parameters

otherQDate

Return type

bool

Returns true if this date is different from d ; otherwise returns false .

PySide2.QtCore.QDate.__lt__(other)
Parameters

otherQDate

Return type

bool

PySide2.QtCore.QDate.__le__(other)
Parameters

otherQDate

Return type

bool

PySide2.QtCore.QDate.__eq__(other)
Parameters

otherQDate

Return type

bool

Returns true if this date is equal to d ; otherwise returns false.

PySide2.QtCore.QDate.__gt__(other)
Parameters

otherQDate

Return type

bool

Returns true if this date is later than d ; otherwise returns false.

PySide2.QtCore.QDate.__ge__(other)
Parameters

otherQDate

Return type

bool

Returns true if this date is later than or equal to d ; otherwise returns false .

PySide2.QtCore.QDate.setDate(year, month, day)
Parameters
  • yearint

  • monthint

  • dayint

Return type

bool

Sets this to represent the date, in the Gregorian calendar, with the given year , month and day numbers. Returns true if the resulting date is valid, otherwise it sets this to represent an invalid date and returns false.

PySide2.QtCore.QDate.setDate(year, month, day, cal)
Parameters
  • yearint

  • monthint

  • dayint

  • calQCalendar

Return type

bool

Sets this to represent the date, in the given calendar cal , with the given year , month and day numbers. Returns true if the resulting date is valid, otherwise it sets this to represent an invalid date and returns false.

static PySide2.QtCore.QDate.shortDayName(weekday[, type=DateFormat])
Parameters
Return type

unicode

Note

This function is deprecated.

Returns the short name of the weekday for the representation specified by type .

The days are enumerated using the following convention:

  • 1 = “Mon”

  • 2 = “Tue”

  • 3 = “Wed”

  • 4 = “Thu”

  • 5 = “Fri”

  • 6 = “Sat”

  • 7 = “Sun”

The day names will be localized according to the system’s locale settings, i.e. using system() .

Returns an empty string if the date is invalid.

static PySide2.QtCore.QDate.shortMonthName(month[, type=DateFormat])
Parameters
Return type

unicode

Note

This function is deprecated.

Returns the short name of the month for the representation specified by type .

The months are enumerated using the following convention:

  • 1 = “Jan”

  • 2 = “Feb”

  • 3 = “Mar”

  • 4 = “Apr”

  • 5 = “May”

  • 6 = “Jun”

  • 7 = “Jul”

  • 8 = “Aug”

  • 9 = “Sep”

  • 10 = “Oct”

  • 11 = “Nov”

  • 12 = “Dec”

The month names will be localized according to the system’s locale settings, i.e. using system() .

Returns an empty string if the date is invalid.

PySide2.QtCore.QDate.startOfDay([spec=Qt.LocalTime[, offsetSeconds=0]])
Parameters
  • specTimeSpec

  • offsetSecondsint

Return type

QDateTime

PySide2.QtCore.QDate.startOfDay(zone)
Parameters

zoneQTimeZone

Return type

QDateTime

This is an overloaded function.

PySide2.QtCore.QDate.toJulianDay()
Return type

qint64

Converts the date to a Julian day.

See also

fromJulianDay()

PySide2.QtCore.QDate.toPython()
Return type

PyObject

PySide2.QtCore.QDate.toString([f=Qt.TextDate])
Parameters

fDateFormat

Return type

unicode

This is an overloaded function.

Returns the date as a string. The format parameter determines the format of the string.

If the format is TextDate , the string is formatted in the default way. The day and month names will be localized names using the system locale, i.e. system() . An example of this formatting is “Sat May 20 1995”.

If the format is ISODate , the string format corresponds to the ISO 8601 extended specification for representations of dates and times, taking the form yyyy-MM-dd, where yyyy is the year, MM is the month of the year (between 01 and 12), and dd is the day of the month between 01 and 31.

If the format is SystemLocaleShortDate or SystemLocaleLongDate , the string format depends on the locale settings of the system. Identical to calling system() . toString (date, ShortFormat ) or system() . toString (date, LongFormat ).

If the format is DefaultLocaleShortDate or DefaultLocaleLongDate , the string format depends on the default application locale. This is the locale set with setDefault() , or the system locale if no default locale has been set. Identical to calling ShortFormat) or LongFormat) .

If the format is RFC2822Date , the string is formatted in an RFC 2822 compatible way. An example of this formatting is “20 May 1995”.

If the date is invalid, an empty string will be returned.

Warning

The ISODate format is only valid for years in the range 0 to 9999. This restriction may apply to locale-aware formats as well, depending on the locale settings.

PySide2.QtCore.QDate.toString(f, cal)
Parameters
Return type

unicode

PySide2.QtCore.QDate.toString(format)
Parameters

format – unicode

Return type

unicode

PySide2.QtCore.QDate.toString(format, cal)
Parameters
Return type

unicode

PySide2.QtCore.QDate.weekNumber()
Return type

(week, yearNumber)

Returns the ISO 8601 week number (1 to 53).

Returns 0 if the date is invalid. Otherwise, returns the week number for the date. If yearNumber is not None (its default), stores the year as *``yearNumber`` .

In accordance with ISO 8601, each week falls in the year to which most of its days belong, in the Gregorian calendar. As ISO 8601’s week starts on Monday, this is the year in which the week’s Thursday falls. Most years have 52 weeks, but some have 53.

Note

*``yearNumber`` is not always the same as year() . For example, 1 January 2000 has week number 52 in the year 1999, and 31 December 2002 has week number 1 in the year 2003.

See also

isValid()

PySide2.QtCore.QDate.year()
Return type

int

This is an overloaded function.

PySide2.QtCore.QDate.year(cal)
Parameters

calQCalendar

Return type

int

Returns the year of this date.

Uses cal as calendar, if supplied, else the Gregorian calendar.

Returns 0 if the date is invalid. For some calendars, dates before their first year may all be invalid.

If using a calendar which has a year 0, check using isValid() if the return is 0. Such calendars use negative year numbers in the obvious way, with year 1 preceded by year 0, in turn preceded by year -1 and so on.

Some calendars, despite having no year 0, have a conventional numbering of the years before their first year, counting backwards from 1. For example, in the proleptic Gregorian calendar, successive years before 1 CE (the first year) are identified as 1 BCE, 2 BCE, 3 BCE and so on. For such calendars, negative year numbers are used to indicate these years before year 1, with -1 indicating the year before 1.