Solving compilation problems

suppress-warning

The generator will generate several warnings which may be irrelevant to the user. The suppress-warning node suppresses the specified warning, and it is a child of the typesystem node.

<typesystem>
    <suppress-warning text="..." />
</typesystem>

The text attribute is the warning text to suppress, and may contain the * wildcard (use “” to escape regular expression matching if the warning contain a regular “*”).

extra-includes

The extra-includes node contains declarations of additional include files, and it can be a child of the namespace-type, value-type and object-type nodes.

The generator automatically tries to read the global header for each type but sometimes it is required to include extra files in the generated C++ code to make sure that the code compiles. These files must be listed using include nodes within the extra-include node:

<value-type>
    <extra-includes>
        <include file-name="..." location="global | local"/>
    </extra-includes>
</value-type>

The file-name attribute is the file to include, such as “QStringList”. The location attribute is where the file is located: global means that the file is located in $INCLUDEPATH and will be included using #include <…>, local means that the file is in a local directory and will be included using #include “…”.

include

The include node specifies the name and location of a file that must be included, and it is a child of the namespace-type, value-type, object-type or extra-includes node.

The generator automatically tries to read the global header for each type. Use the include node to override this behavior, providing an alternative file. The include node can also be used to specify extra include files.

<value-type>
    <include file-name="..."
        location="global | local"/>
</value-type>

The file-name attribute is the file to include, such as “QStringList”. The location attribute is where the file is located: global means that the file is located in $INCLUDEPATH and will be included using #include <…>, local means that the file is in a local directory and will be included using #include “…”.