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Studio: Inspector Palette

The Inspector palette is the most-used palette in Studio. It is used to control which properties are animated or change on a per-slide basis and the values for each of those properties.

Animating Properties

Almost every property of every element may be animated at runtime. Non-animatable exceptions are properties with discrete values (booleans, text strings, or drop-down lists).

Properties that can be animated have a small stopwatch icon next to them in the Inspector palette. Click on this icon to enable animation for an property.

Turning off the toggle for an property with complex animation saves the keyframes during the same session; if you accidentally turn off animation you can turn it back on and all your keyframes will come back. However, if you save your presentation with the animation turned off, those keyframes are discarded. Re-enabling animation after re-opening the presentation will start with a blank slate.

Unlinking from the Master Slide

By default, elements on the master slide of their owning time context have the same property values on all slides. If you change the Scale of an that change is applied on all slides. However, it is also possible to "unlink" any property of a master element. An unlinked attriute can have custom values and animations for each slide.

To unlink an property, right-click on the property name in the Inspector palette and choose "Unlink Property from Master Slide". The name of the property will change from green to light grey. This is the same color used for the name of elements that are present only on a single slide, and the properties of such elements.

Tip: when you first unlink a property the current value for that property, including any animation keyframes, is used as the value for every slide. If you want a similar-but-slightly-different animation on all or most slides, first create the animation on the master slide and then unlink the property and tweak the animation on other slides. A little thinking ahead can save you from needing to perform redudant work.

Editing Numeric Values

Studio provides two mechanisms for experimentally changing numeric values in the Inspector palette when you are not sure of the exact value you want.

  1. When a numeric input is not already focused (ready to be typed into), click and drag the mouse up and down on the number you want to change. The value will increase or decrease as you drag the mouse, and the scene view will update to show the effect of the change.
  2. With a numeric input focused, press the up/down arrow keys to increment/decrement the value by 1 for each key press.

With both of these techniques, you can hold down the shift key to make the values adjust by 10 instead of 1, or hold down the control key to make the values adjust by 0.1 instead.

Scene/Component Properties

Scenes and components are both "time contexts". When their contents are displayed in the Timeline palette (when you are "inside" the scene or component) and the element is selected, the following properties are shown in the Inspector palette specific to the active slide:

  • Play Mode: Controls what happens when the playhead reaches the end time for the slide:
    • Stop at end - This default value simply holds the playhead at the end time, with any animated properties holding their final value.
    • Looping - Upon reaching the final time the playhead starts over at time 0.
    • PingPong - Upon reaching the final time the playhead starts playing backwards; upon reaching time 0 the playeah starts playing forwards again.
    • Ping - Similar to PingPong, but when the playhead reaches time 0 it stops playback and holds that time.
    • Play Through To... - Upon reaching the final time the scene or component will switch to a new slide. This is useful to have an intro animation that then leads into a looping animation (on a separate slide). You may specify a specific slide to play through to, or simply the next/previous slide in the Slide palette. ^{}
  • Initial Play State - When entering this slide, should the playhead immediately start playing, or wait to be started? Using the Pause setting is particularly useful when QML application is going to control the time for the context and you don't need or want the runtime attempting to do its own work.

Layer Properties

Selecting a layer in the Timeline palette shows the following properties in the Inspector palette:

  • Disable Depth Test - Controls whether depth-testing is used when rendering objects in the layer. For details see the discussion on the Disable Depth Test page.
  • Progressive AA - Controls whether progressive anti-aliasing is used when rendering the layer. For details see the discussion on Progressive Anti-Aliasing.
  • Multisample AA - Controls whether multisample anti-aliasing is used when rendering the layer. For details see the discussion on Multisample Anti-Aliasing.
  • Temporal AA - Controls whether temporal anti-aliasing is used when rendering the layer. For details see the discussion on Temporal Anti-Aliasing.
  • Layer Background - Controls how the layer clears when it starts to render each frame:
    • Transparent - Clear the layer to transparent each frame so that content behind it can be seen.
    • Unspecified - Do not clear layer each frame. This provides a slight performance boost if the layer is filled with content, and hence will fully overwrite the previous result.
    • Solid Color - Clear this layer to a non-transparent color. This provides a slight performance boost if the layer fills the viewport and if you turn off "Enable Background Color" for the Scene.
  • Blend Mode - Controls how colors in the active layer blends with colors in the background layer. For details see the discussion on the Blend Mode page.
    • Normal - Default blend mode. Opaque objects will occlude objects in layers behind.
    • Screen - Colors are blended using an inverted multiply, producing a lighter result.
    • Multiply - Colors are blended using a multiply, producing a darker result.
    • Add - Colors are blended by addition, producing a lighter result.
    • Subtract - Colors are blended by subtraction, producing a darker result.
    • Overlay - A mix of Multiply and Screen modes, producing a result with higher contrast.
    • Colorburn - Colors are blended by inverted division where the result also is inverted, producing a darker result. Darker than Multiply.
    • Colordodge - Colors are blended by inverted division, producing a lighter result. Lighter than Screen.
  • Horizontal Fields - Choose which two fields of Left, Width, and Right are used to control the horizontal placement and sizing of the layer within the presentation.
  • Left - The distance between the left edges of the presentation and the layer, either in pixels or as a percentage of the presentation's width.
  • Width - The width of the layer, either in pixels or as a percentage of the presentation's width.
  • Right - The distance between the right edges of the presentation and the layer, either in pixels or as a percentage of the presentation's width.
  • Vertical Fields - Choose which two fields of Top, Height, and Bottom are used to control the vertical placement and sizing of the layer within the presentation.
  • Top - The distance between the top edges of the presentation and the layer, either in pixels or as a percentage of the presentation's height.
  • Height - The height of the layer, either in pixels or as a percentage of the presentation's height.
  • Bottom - The distance between the bottom edges of the presentation and the layer, either in pixels or as a percentage of the presentation's height.
  • Sub-Presentation - If you specify a value here, it is intepreted to be the id attribute of another presentation in the .uia application file. Instead of rendering the contents of this layer, the specified presentation will be rendered and composited in place of this layer. For more information, see the discussion on the Using Sub-Presentations page.
  • Ambient Occlusion - Controls the strength of ambient occlusion (AO). AO is a form of approximated global illumination which causes non-directional self-shadowing where objects are close together. A value of 100 causes full darkness shadows; lower values cause the shadowing to appear lighter. A value of 0 disables ambient occlusion entirely, improving performance at a cost to the visual realism of 3D objects rendered in the layer. All values other than 0 have the same impact to the performance.
  • AO Distance - Roughly how far (in world units) ambient occlusion shadows spread away from objects. The following graphic illustrates a variety of distances, starting with 0 (no AO) at left. Greater distances cause increasing impact to performance.

  • AO Softness - How smooth the edges of the AO shading are. The following graphic illustrates a variety of softness values, going from 0 at left to 100 at right.

  • AO Threshold - A cutoff distance preventing objects from exhibiting AO at close distances. Higher values increase the distance required between objects before AO is seen.
    • Note: If you see AO shadowing on objects where there should be no shadowing, increase the AO Threshold value slightly to clip away close results.

  • AO Sampling Rate - Larger values result in better AO quality (more shades of gray) at the expense of performance.
  • AO Detail - Scatters the edges of the AO shadow bands to improve smoothness (at the risk of sometimes producing obvious patterned artifacts).
    • Note: Very large distances between the clipping planes of your camera may cause problems with AO. If you are seeing odd banding in your AO, try adjusting the Far Clip Plane of your camera to be closer to your content.

  • Shadow Strength - Controls the strength of directional occlusion (DO). DO is a form of approximated directional shadowing. A value of 100 causes full darkness shadows; lower values cause the shadowing to appear lighter. A value of 0 disables DO entirely, improving performance at a cost to the visual realism of 3D objects rendered in the layer. All values other than 0 have the same impact to the performance.
    • Note: Directional occlusion will only render on Standard Materials that have the Lighting property set to Pixel.

  • Shadow Distance - Roughly how far (in world units) the faked shadows spread away from objects.
  • Shadow Softness - Crossfade amount between sharp shadows and smooth gradations.
  • Shadow Threshold - A cutoff distance preventing objects from self-shadowing. Higher values increase the distance required between objects before DO is seen.
    • Note: If you see DO shadowing in regions where there should be no shadowing, increase the Shadow Threshold value slightly to clip away close results.

  • Light Probe - Select an image (preferably a high dynamic range image (.hdr)) to use to light the scene, either instead of or in addition to standard lights. If selected, note that this image will be used as the environment for any custom .material, instead of the environment often associated with them. For details see Using Image-based Lighting.
  • IBL Brightness - The amount of light emitted by the light probe.
  • IBL Horizon Cutoff - Increasing the value will add darkness (black) to the bottom half of the environment, forcing the lighting to come predominantly from the top of the image (and removing specific reflections from the lower half).
  • IBL FOV Angle - The image source field of view.
  • Secondary Light Probe - Select an image to use as secondary IBL light source.
  • Probe Crossfade - The blend amount between the primary and secondary light probes.

Transform Properties

Selecting an element in the Timeline palette that has a 3D presence shows the following properties in the Inspector palette:

  • Position - The local position of the element in the space established by the parent element. Note that Qt 3D Studio uses a Y-up "left-handed" coordinate system. Increasing values of X go to the right (as seen from the default camera location), increasing values of Y go up, and increasing values of Z go away from the camera.
  • Rotation - The local rotation of the element in the space established by the parent element. Each value is the left-handed rotation about the axis in question, with the direction of the axes as described above. Rotations are applied in the order ZXY.
  • Scale - The local scale of the element in the space established by the parent element. Note that an odd-number of negative scale values will cause your element to render 'inside-out', which cannot be seen due to backface-culling.
  • Pivot - The local pivot offset for the object. You can think of the pivot as offsetting the geometry for the element away from the origin, allowing an object to rotate and scale around a point other than its local origin. Pivots are applied before scaling and rotation.
  • Opacity - Although not technically a transformation, every transformable element has an opacity applied to it. An opacity of 100 causes the object to be fully opaque, while an opacity of 0 prevents an object from rendering at all.

Just as modifying the position or rotation of a parent element affects all descendant elements, opacity is multiplicatively cumulative through the transform hierarchy. A cube that is 50% opaque inside a group that is 80% opaque will render with an equivalent apperance of 40% opacity (0.8 * 0.5 = 0.4). Setting the opacity of a group to 0 will prevent any descendants within the group from rendering.

For models, having an equivalent opacity of 0 also prevents any touch events from being processed for the element. If you can't see the cube, you can't click on it. Note, however, that you may alternatively adjust the opacity of a material to 0. In this case you cannot see the model but you can click on it.

Camera Properties

A camera selected in the Timeline palette shows the following properties in the Inspector palette (in addition to the transform properties described above):

  • Orthographic - When enabled, the layer for this camera renders all contents with no perspective. Additionally the default scale of the camera ensures that each world unit renders at exactly one pixel in the final presentation.

Orthographic layers (layers with a camera set to be orthographic) are ideal for layering 2D UI elements. Not only are your images guaranteed to be the right size on the screen, you can use the Z position of objects to bring them closer to/farther from the camera (z-sorting) with no foreshortening artifacts.

  • Field of View - For perspective cameras (ones without the Orthographic box checked), this is the number of degrees between the top and bottom edges of the camera frustum. The larger the value, the stronger the sense of 3D in your scene. The horizontal field of view is automatically calculated based on the aspect ratio of the presentation as authored in Studio.
  • Clipping Start/End - Content closer to the camera than the clipping start or farther than the clipping end will not be rendered. This occurs at the pixel level, not the element level: a model that crosses the clipping plane may be only partially rendered.

The default values are intended to cause anything within the view of the camera to be rendered. Aside from special clipping effects, you may need to adjust these values to more closely contain your content for better results with a layer effect that uses the depth buffer of the camera, such as the Depth of Field effect.

  • Scale Mode - When the final size of the layer is different than the presentation size (due to the application scale mode and/or the layer size), this setting controls how the camera adjusts to fill the space:
    • Fit - render the content seen by the camera (based on the aspect ratio of the presentation) larger or smaller to fit within the layer. When the aspect ratio of the layer is different than the presentation additional content will be shown either above/below or left/right; the content seen by the camera will never be cropped.
    • Same Size - render the content seen by the camera at the same size (same number of pixels) as seen when the layer size is the same as the presentation sized authored in Studio. Layers smaller than the original presentation size will cause content to be cropped, while larger layers will cause additional content (beyond the original bounds of the camera) to be shown.
  • Scale Anchor - When changes to the layer size cause the camera to render more or less content this property controls which part of the content stays in the same spot relative to the layer. A value of Center causes the center of the camera to always remain in the center of the layer, a value of NW causes the upper left corner of the content seen in Studio to always be at the upper left corner of the layer, a value of N causes the top middle of the content seen in Studio to always be at the top middle edge of the layer, and so forth.

Light Properties

A light selected in the Timeline palette shows the following properties in the Inspector palette (in addition to the transform properties described above):

  • Scope - Select an element to have this light affect only that element and its descendants.
  • Light Type - Choose whether the light is a directional or point light:
    • Directional - Lighting is applied uniformly in the direction of the Z axis for this light. The rotation of directional lights affects the result, but not the position or scale.
    • Point - Lighting is applied outwards from the center of the light, becoming increasingly dim away from the center. (See the Brightness and Linear/Exponential Fade properties below.) The position of point lights affects the result, but not the rotation or scale.
    • Area - Lighting emits from the +Z face of a rectangular light. Use the X/Y scale transforms to control the size of the area light.
      • Tip: turn on Bounding Boxes (Ctrl-B) to see the size of the area light when selected.
  • Light Color - The diffuse color (and intensity) applied to models illuminated by this light.
  • Specular Color - The specular color (and intensity) applied to models illuminated by this light. Note that a model's material must have a non-zero Specular Amount for any specular lighting to take effect.
  • Ambient Color - The diffuse color (and intensity) applied to materials before being lit by this light.
  • Brightness (point light only) - An overall multiplier for the light's effects.
  • Linear Fade (point light only) - Turn up this value to increase the rate at which the lighting effect dims the farther surfaces are from the light.
  • Exponential Fade (point light only) - Turn up this value to increase the rate at which the lighting effect dims on surfaces that are extra far away from the light.
  • Cast Shadows? - Simulate shadows using this light?
  • Shadow Darkness - How dark should the cast shadows be?
  • Shadow Softness - Amount of blur applied to the shadows.
  • Shadow Resolution - Size of the shadow map created for the shadows (affects performance and memory usage).
  • Shadow Depth Bias - Tweak this value by small amounts if you see objects casting shadows on themselves.
  • Shadow Far Clip - Maximum distance for the shadow map; smaller values may improve the precision and effects of the map.
  • Shadow Field of View - Shadow camera field of view.

Notes:

  • Each additional light will reduce rendering performance of your presentation. Use them sparingly. Employ a light probe on the layer for image-based lighting that can produce soft and subtle lighting.
  • The Lighting property for materials (see below) affects the quality/performance of lighting on a per-material basis.
  • When using only a light probe, or when using an interface layer where the materials are all set to use None for the lighting, it is valid and beneficial to delete all lights from a layer.
  • Cast shadows work best with area or point lights.

Model Properties

A model selected in the Timeline palette shows the following properties in the Inspector palette (in addition to the transform properties described above):

  • Mesh - A "model" is just a notional placeholder for displaying geometry, and you may change which geometry is displayed (when authoring in Studio, or during Runtime) by picking a new mesh for the geometry. Clicking the drop-down for this property will open a floating mesh picker. Hover a mesh to see how it appears in the scene for this model, and click on a mesh to pick it as the new mesh.
  • Tesselation Mode - Dynamically generate additional geometry for the model. Tessellation is useful if you are using a displacement map with your geometry, or if you wish to generate a smoother silhouette (Phong and NPatch tessellation modes only) when zooming in.
  • Tip: turn on tessellation wireframe mode (View menu or toolbar) to display the tessellation result.

Material Properties

A material selected in the Timeline palette shows the different properties in the Inspector palette depending on the type of the material, chosen in the top-most property:

  • Material Type - Controls the type of material to be used. The values are "Standard Material" and "Referenced Material", followed by a list of any custom .material files present your application folder.
  • Tip: Material Type is a special type of property that cannot be unlinked or changed at runtime. If you want to change the type of material used for a model, set the material type to "Referenced Material" and then unlink the Referenced Material property to reference different materials during runtime.

Standard Materials

  • IBL override - IBL probe to use in place of the layer probe.
  • Lighting - Choose the type of lighting calculations used for this material:
    • Pixel - Diffuse and specular lighting is calculated for each rendered pixel. This produces better results than Vertex lighting, but is slightly more expensive to compute. Certain effects (such as a Fresnel or bump map) require Pixel lighting to work.
    • None - No lighting is calculated. This mode is (predictably) very fast, and is quite effective when image maps are used that you do not need to be shaded by lighting.
  • Blending Mode - Choose how the colors of this object blend with those behind it. For details see the discussion on the Blend Mode page.
    • Normal - Default blend mode. Opaque objects occlude objects behind them.
    • Screen - Colors are blended using an inverted multiply, producing a lighter result. This blend mode is order-independent; if you are using semi-opaque objects and experiencing 'popping' as faces or models sort differently, using Screen blending is one way to produce results without popping.
    • Multiply - Colors are blended using a multiply, producing a darker result. This blend mode is also order-independent.
    • Overlay - A mix of Multiply and Screen modes, producing a result with higher contrast.
    • Colorburn - Colors are blended by inverted division where the result also is inverted, producing a darker result. Darker than Multiply.
    • Colordodge - Colors are blended by inverted division, producing a lighter result. Lighter than Screen.
  • Diffuse Color - The base color for the material. Set to black to create a purely-specular material (e.g. metals or mirrors).
  • Diffuse Map/2/3 - Image maps to apply to the material as a texture. Click to pick an image from the project directory. Using an image format with transparency (e.g. PNG or DDS with DXT5) will also apply the alpha channel as an opacity map.
  • Specular Reflection - An image map used for specular highlights on the material. By default the map is applied using environmental mapping (not UV mapping): as you rotate the model the map will appear as though it is reflecting from the environment. Specular Reflection maps are an easy way to add a high-quality look with relatively low cost.
    • Tip: Using a Light Probe on your Layer for image-based lighting will automatically use that image as the specular reflection.
    • Tip: Studio comes installed with a variety of helpful specular maps for your use. Click the maps button at the bottom of the Project palette to open the library, open the Specular Reflection folder, and drag maps into the Project palette to copy them to your project.
    • Tip: Crisp images cause your material to look very glossy; the more you blur your image the softer your material will appear.
  • Specular Tint - A color used to adjust the specular reflections. Use white for no effect
  • Specular Amount - Controls the strength of specularity (highlights and reflections). Note that this property does not affect the Specular Reflection map, but does affect the amount of reflections from a layer's Light Probe.
    • Tip: Unless your mesh is high resolution, you may need to use Pixel lighting (see above) to get good specular highlights from scene lights.
  • Specular Map - A grayscale image map to modulate the amount of specularity across the surface of the material. These values are multiplied by the Specular Amount.
  • Specular Roughness - Controls the size of the specular highlight generated from lights, and the clarity of reflections in general. Larger values increase the roughness, softening specular highlights and blurring reflections.
  • Fresnel Power - Decreases head-on reflections (looking directly at the surface) while maintaining reflections seen at grazing angles.
  • Index of Refraction - Controls what angles of reflections are affected by the Fresnel Power.
  • Bump Map - A grayscale image map to simulate fine geometry displacement across the surface of the material. Brighter pixels indicate raised regions. The amount of the effect is controlled by the Bump Amount property.
    • Tip: Bump maps will not affect the silhouette of a model. Use a displacement map if this is required.
  • Normal Map - An RGB image used to simulate fine geometry displacement across the surface of the material. The RGB channels indicate XYZ normal deviations. The amount of the effect is controlled by the Bump Amount property.
    • Tip: Normal maps will not affect the silhouette of a model. Use a displacement map if this is required.
  • Bump Amount - Controls the amount of simulated displacement for a Bump Map or a Normal Map.
  • Displacement Map - A grayscale image used to offset the vertices of geometry across the surface of the material. Brighter pixels indicate raised regions. The amount of the effect is controlled by the Displacement Amount property.
    • Tip: Displacement maps require vertices to offset. If your model is not high-enough resolution you may need to dynamically generate additional vertices by using the Tessellation properties on the model.
    • Tip: Displacement maps do not affect the normals of your geometry. To look correct with lighting or reflections you will likely want to also add a matching bump map or normal map to your material.
  • Emissive Power - The amount of self-illumination from the material. In a scene with black ambient lighting a material with 0 emissive power will appear black wherever the light does not shine on it; turning the emissive power to 100 will cause the material to appear as its diffuse color instead.
    • Tip: When you want a material to not be affected by lighting, instead of using 100% emissive power consider setting the lighting mode to None for a performance benefit.
  • Emissive Map - An image map used to set the emissive power for different parts of the material. Using a grayscale image will not affect the color of the result, while using a color image will produce glowing regions with the color affected by the emissive map.
  • Opacity - Drop the opacity of just this material, separate from the model.
    • Note: Setting the opacity of a model very low (below 1% or less) will prevent it from receiving touch events, but setting the opacity of its material very low still allows touch events to occur.
  • Opacity Map - An image map used to control the opacity differently for different parts of the material. Note that you must use an image format with transparency (e.g. a 32-bit PNG, or a DDS with an alpha portion) for the opacity to be applied. You cannot use a grayscale PNG file, for example, to control the opacity.

Note that the Runtime custom-compiles shaders for each unique combination of material properties used. Each additional material feature that you use results in a (slight) additional performance hit.

Referenced Materials

A "referenced material" uses whatever settings are present on another material element. This both allows you to have 'master' materials - changing the settings on one material affects all the others - and also provides a mechanism for quickly switching between different material types (in either Studio or at runtime). When you select this type of material, the Inspector palette shows only a single property:

  • Referenced Material - a picker for selecting another material within the presentation.
  • Tip: the material you reference does not have to be visible or even active for this to work. It is valid to have a small pile of models with custom materials on them all eyeballed off, and then reference those materials for rendering on other objects.

Image Properties

When image maps are applied to a material (e.g. Diffuse, Specular, Opacity, etc.) a new element appears in the Timeline palette as a child of the material. This element represents the properties that control that image, allowing them to be animated over time. Selecting one of these images shows the following properties in the Inspector palette:

  • U/V Repeat - Controls how many copies of the image are displayed across the UV coordinates of the material. With UV Tiling set to "No Repeat" this will cause the image to only show once on a smaller portion of the material.
  • Texture Mapping - Choose how the image is applied to the material:
    • UV Mapping - The default for diffuse and opacity maps, this causes the image to be stuck to the mesh. The same portion of the image will always appear on the same vertex (unless the UV properties are animated).
    • Environmental Mapping - The default for specular reflection, this causes the image to be 'projected' onto the material as though it is being reflected. Using Environmental Mapping for diffuse maps provides a mirror effect.
  • U/V Tiling - Controls how the image map is applied across the material when the U/V repeat values are greater than 1.
  • UV Rotation - Rotates the image map around the pivot point.
  • U/V Position - Slides the image map across the UV coordinates.
  • U/V Pivot - Sets the pivot location in UV space.
  • Sub-Presentation - If you specify a value here, it is intepreted to be the id attribute of another presentation in the .uia application file. Instead of displaying the contents of this image on the material, the specified presentation will be rendered and the resulting image will be used instead. For more information, see the discussion on the Using Sub-Presentations page.

Text Properties

A text element selected in the Timeline palette shows the following properties in the Inspector palette (in addition to the transform properties described above):

  • Text String - The text to display for the text element.
    • Note: Qt 3D Studio does not (currently) support styled text. There is no way to make one word in a paragraph bold, larger, or a different color.
    • Note: Qt 3D Studio also does not (currently) support automatically wrapping text; you must manually inject line breaks to wrap your text.
  • Text Color - The color for the text.
  • Font - Click to open a font browser. This will only look for font files inside the fonts directory for your project.
  • Font Size - Changes the size of the font. In addition to clicking the drop-down to pick from predefined font sizes, you can also type a new value for the font.
    • Tip: Although the font size is just a number, it is intentionally not animatable. Each time the font size changes a rather expensive rasterization of the text string occurs. You should animate the scale of the text element instead.
  • Horizontal/Vertical Alignment - Controls the placement of the text with respect to the text element's origin. Note that this is for the entire text box, and as such may include padding reserved for characters not present in your text string. (For example, using the Text String "Text" with Vertical Alignment of Bottom will cause the baseline of the letters to appear above the origin for the element. Adding characters with descenders, such as "y", illustrates why this occurs.)
  • Leading - Controls the amount of extra (or negative) vertical spacing between lines of text.
  • Tracking - Controls the amount of extra (or negative) horizontal spacing between every character pair.

Alias Properties

An alias selected in the Timeline palette shows the following properties in the Inspector palette (in addition to the transform properties described above):

  • Reference - the node to create an alias of.
  • Note that you cannot create an alias of a Scene, Layer, Behavior, Material, Effect, or Image element. You can only alias items that have a transform, i.e. groups, components, cameras, lights, models, and text.

Path Properties

A path selected in the Timeline palette shows the following properties in the Inspector palette (in addition to the transform properties described above):

  • Path - the .path file on disk to reference for this path, or [None] if this path has been internalized.
  • Stroke Width - the size of the stroke in local units.
  • Path Type
    • Painted - the path is filled and/or stroked with perfect precision and UV coordinates relative to the bounding box.
    • Geometry the path is stroked with geometry with customizable tessellation. UV coordinates are relative to the path, i.e. along and across the length.

For Painted Paths

  • Paint Style
    • Filled and Stroked - the path has independent materials for the fill and stroke.
    • Filled - the path has only one material, for the fill.
    • Stroked - the path has only one material, for the stroke.

For Geometry Paths

  • CPU Limit - amount of tessellation work done on the CPU before GPU tessellation is involved; lower numbers use more CPU values. Edge and Width Detail are applied after the CPU is done.
    • Tip: for best performance you usually want to leave this at a high value, leaning mostly on the GPU for tessellation.
  • Edge Detail - amount of GPU tessellation detail used to improve the appearance of the stroke.
    • Tip: Turn on Wireframe view (from the View menu or the toolbar) to see the underlying geometry being created for the stroke.
  • Width Detail - amount of GPU tessellation detail used to create geometry across the width of the stroke. Unless you are using a material with a displacement map for the stroke, you likely should leave this set at the lowest setting to improve performance.
    • Tip: Turn on Wireframe view (from the View menu or the toolbar) to see the underlying geometry being created for the stroke.
  • Begin/End Cap Style - set this to "Taper" to finely taper the end of your stroke over a specified distance. Additional properties will appear allowing you to control the length of the taper, and the size and opacity at the end of the taper.

SubPath Properties

When you have internalized a path you will see a SubPath child element in the Timeline for each set of path commands in the path. Selecting this element shows a single property allowing you to modify whether the SubPath is "closed" or not:

  • Closed Path? - should the stroke for the path be 'closed', drawing a straight line from the last anchor point to the first?
  • SubPaths in SVG are always 'closed' with respect to the fill. This property only affects the stroke.

Anchor Point Properties

When you have internalized a path each SubPath element in the Timeline will have child Anchor Point elements for each point along the path. Selecting these elements shows the following properties in the Inspector palette:

  • Position - the 2D location of the point with respect to the origin of the path. (Though the entire path lives in 3D space within the presentation, the points are all constrained to the same 2D plane, which you may choose to position or rotate in 3D space.)
  • Handle Angle - every anchor is treated as a cubic Bézier with a locked (smooth) tangent. This property controls the angle of that tangent measured counter-clockwise from horizontal going right to left.
  • Incoming/Outgoing Distance - the distance of the control point from the anchor. The "Incoming" value is meaningless for the first anchor point, as is the "Outgoing" value for the last anchor point.

Available under certain Qt licenses.
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